Preparing your home for a wildfire

prepare home for wildfireWildfires are called wild because they are often uncontrollable. They frequently begin unnoticed but they can spread quickly, igniting brush, trees, and homes. Preparation is the only control you’ll have in order to protect your home from damage and losses when a wildfire occurs. Make sure to address the areas in your home that are more susceptible to wildfires in order to keep you and your family protected when a wildfire threatens your area.

There are two primary areas of concern when it comes to limiting ignition of your home from exposure to a wildfire. First, a number of features, materials and design details of the structure itself can make it vulnerable to a wildfire. Second, the surrounding vegetation near your home can provide a pathway for an approaching wildfire to get close enough to your home. Knowing which materials to use will give your home more time to sustain itself before firefighters can reach your area.

You probably already have a list of property improvement projects. Maybe you need a new roof, want to replace old windows or doors with new energy-efficient models, or need to rebuild a deck or porch. If so, there are a few things you should take into consideration when remodeling your home in order to protect it from a wildfire. Use fire-resistant or noncombustible materials on the roof and exterior structure of the dwelling, or treat wood or combustible material used in roofs, siding, decking, or trim with fire-retardant chemicals evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory.

Also, if you live in a wildfire prone area, it’s important to landscape your home with wildfire safety in mind. The actions you take to modify the vegetation in your home are intended to reduce the severity of the fire. This also reduces the chances that flames will come into direct contact with any part of the structure or for the high-intensity flames to break the glass in windows or cause other surfaces to catch on fire. Make sure to select materials and plants that can help contain fire rather than fuel it. Plant fire-resistant shrubs and trees, for example, hardwood trees are less flammable than pine, evergreen, eucalyptus or fir trees.

For more information, please visit www.FirstProtector.com.

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