Make your yard hurricane ready

Hurricane readyWe’re in the middle of hurricane season and even though there is no way to predict if a storm will strike, it is best to be safe than sorry. Taking the time to make your yard hurricane ready by identifying potential risk areas can save you a headache in the long run. It may be difficult to entirely protect your home and yard from the strong winds of a hurricane, but there are certain steps you can take to help minimize the damage. Here are a few landscape solutions to consider this hurricane season.

Choosing the right trees.
Before choosing new plants and trees for your yard, find out how wind resistant they are. For example, palms, live oak and sea grape all tolerate strong winds. However, there are others that are prone to more storm damage. Therefore, carefully consider the type of trees you plant in your yard. Consider planting trees in groups to make them more wind resistant and so that they can act as a buffer for your home and other plants in your landscape.

Prune regularly.
Many homes are damaged each year when strong gusts of wind cause branches to fall on rooftops. Proper and frequent pruning can shape your trees in ways that make them more resistant to damage from high winds and will also make your landscape look nice. When pruning, you should consider trimming dead and damaged tree limbs and those that are close to your home, fence or power lines.

Use soft gardening materials.
Consider replacing the materials in your yard than can be dangerous. If you have hard materials such as rock or pea gravel around your yard, consider replacing then with shredded bark or other soft mulch. During a hurricane, small rocks can become projectiles, often breaking windows or damaging your home. Shredded bark or mulch is softer and less dangerous if caught in the wind.

Minimize dangers.
Once a storm has been tracked, there are things you should and shouldn’t do in your yard. Avoid trimming branches and vegetation to keep your yard free from debris and don’t begin any building projects outdoors that may be difficult to clean up before a storm makes landfall. If a tropical storm or hurricane is approaching, bring anything that can be a potential wind hazard or projectile inside, for example, toys, potted plants, and lawn furniture.

By following the tips listed above, your home will be well on its way to becoming hurricane ready!

For more information, please visit www.FirstProtector.com.

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